JULY 29th – NOVEMBER 19th, 2021

Universidad Austral offers semester courses in English that cover several fields, with a focus on Argentina and/or Latin America. The University also offers Spanish as a second language courses up to B2 level.   

When selecting your courses, keep in mind the following:

  • A B2 level (72 iBT TOEFL / 6.0 IELTS) is requested for non-native students taking courses in English. We require a certificate  taken no more than 3 years before.
  • Students may enrol in a máximum of 5 courses or complete a maximum of 15 credits/30 ECTS.
  • Courses are subject to cancellation if enrollment below prescribed minimums. We will run a course once 5 students are enrolled.
  • The second semester runs from August-November
  • Courses in English and Spanish as a second language* courses are held in Buenos Aires.
  • Students must attend at least 80% of the classes in each course.
  • The orientation day is mandatory, and takes place the week before courses begin.

Course Registration Process: In the Application Form you must load the learning agreement with a list of ten courses your university has approved. Upon acceptance, you will complete a pre-registration form so that you can mark your priorities among those ten courses. You will be allowed to take the courses chosen in your Learning Agreement. After 5 business days, you finally register confirming your course selection to the Exchange Coordinator.

*Students taking Spanish as a Second Language will have the Spanish level exam the day of the orientation

 

Fall (August-November)

Art and Politics

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

This course considers artistic developments in Latin America, from early twentieth-century avant-garde movements to recent contemporary projects. With the understanding that the modern construct of “Latin America” encompasses an area of tre-mendous ethnic, racial, and linguistic diversity, we will survey a broad range of art practices throughout the Americas as well as major modern architectural projects in Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. Particular attention will be paid to cases in which artists and architects worked in the service of governmental regimes, as in Mexican muralism in the 1920s and the construc-tion of Brasília, a new national capital for Brazil, in the 1950s. We will also examine those cases in which artworks and artistic networks offered a means of challenging or subverting repressive policies. Beyond politics, this course focuses on the ten-sions—indigenous vs. cosmopolitan, urban vs. rural, rich vs. poor—and the international dialogues that have informed the production and reception of art and architecture in the region. Group and individual visits to museums are integral aspects of this course, so that we may consider the contributions of artists from Latin America to global modern and contemporary art.

Course aims

While honing the careful looking, critical reading, clear writing, and effective public speaking skills that the history of art and architecture teaches, participants will:
• gain accurate knowledge of the great diversity and richness of artistic and architectural traditions in modern and contemporary Latin America, and learn to identify broad patterns of historical and regional categorization within the field of study.
• develop insights into how the production and reception of art in the region has been affected by processes of transnational and transatlantic movement and exchange.
• evaluate the ways in which artists have both articulated and challenged national and regional histories, identities, and stereotypes over time through their choices of subjects, mediums, styles, and modes of diffusion.
• analyze the complex interrelations among agents, institutions, publics, and markets in the production and recep-tion of works of modern art and architecture.
• assess the mechanisms by which “Latin American Art” came to be a category within the history of modern and contemporary art in the 1980s, and the limitations of this model.

Business Planning

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

Business planning is an integral tool for any business to evaluate its potential and map out a desired future for the short and mid term.

Being the students’ first approach to this topic, the course will address two areas: the regular process and conventional format of a BP, and the key concepts and tools of the several disciplines that it involves, such as Finance, Marketing, Strategic Planning, etc.

Throughout the course, students will work in groups on their own business plans. They will have the chance to experience the full process and practice improving the plan in iterative cycles, based on feedback and discussion in class.

Course Learning Objectives:

  • To know what are the key components, format and style of a BP.
  • To understand the purpose of Business Planning.
  • To learn and apply analysis tools commonly used to evaluate the business potential, products and services positioning and strategic stand.
  • To be able to put together an organizational plan and a marketing plan.
  • To understand the financial documents that constitute a BP and be able to produce a 3 years P&L projection.
  • To understand the specific aspects of business planning for nonprofit organizations.

Pre-Requisites:

Mid-level domain of MS Excel or similar software.

Economic Development and Business Environment in Argentina

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The course analyses the economic development of the region from a historical perspective, paying special attention to some recent events in the region and in Argentina. The students will learn a variety of concepts, which will enable them to comprehend economic cycles, economic growth and the way regions interact with one another. This framework will be used to approach the study of the way in which the economy of different Latin American countries has evolved.

Contents:

After a brief overview of some fundamental concepts in the field of macroeconomics, the course will cover, among others:

  • Stages of economic development
  • Import substitution policies
  • Inflation
  • Stabilization
  • Dollarization
  • Socio-Economic development
  • Institutions and productivity
  • Poverty and Inequality

International Arbitration

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

This course has been designed to meet the complex needs of practicing attorneys and advanced Law students, from a range of backgrounds, interested in gaining first-hand knowledge and practical tools in the field of international arbitration, specially related to international treaties and arbitration practice.  The course is conducted in English.  It features a practical approach, the use of the case-method, continuing assessment trough in-class questions, quizzes and a final exam.

Interdisciplinary Project

ampus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The media project’s key focus lays on digital media with a particular emphasis on mobile media and/or social media

  • The students are invited and encouraged to pick a research topic (i.e. anything that is located at the core or the periphery of media)
  • The students formulate research questions on their own, frame them by a reasonable theoretical body of knowledge and/or research design

Overall Learning Goals:

On completion of this online module the student:

  • Applied his/her methodological knowledge within a broader context.
  • Learns to make use of his/her scientific capabilities for the benefit of tackling management issues related to innovations in media.
  • Will have developed a profound understanding of a particular aspect of digital media and/or social media.
  • Will have applied his/her scientific writing and thinking skills to a focused research issue.
  • Will have improved his/her (English) academic writing skills.

Unit Structure and General Project Briefing:

The task for the project is to author an analytical article. The course is not structured into units. However, there is weekly interaction into phases:

  • Phase 1, about 3 weeks. Some actual topics. The aim of this phase is to trigger some topics that could be useful for choosing the analytical topic for each student (e.g. cultural dimensions of technology, modes of interaction in social networks, issues of privacy, concentration of data, etc.)
  • Phase 2, about 3 weeks. Pick the article topic. Each student should pick a topic and discuss with the professor the strategy to find the sources needed.
  • Phase 3, about 2 weeks. Topic complements. Based on the topics selected by the students, the professor will present some general issues and sources related with the particular articles.
  • Phase 4. Follow up. Students should present incremental development of their article and discuss that wit the professor. The professor will suggest improvements.
  • Phase 5, last 2 weeks. Article submission, and class presentation of the article.

 

 

International Development Cooperation in Latin America

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

Recent international milestones such as the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals or COP21 in Paris have stressed the importance of sustainable development and of development cooperation. This course will explore these two topics in an international context, focusing on Latin America. It will describe chosen development challenges faced by the international community, and the actors working on reducing social and economic disparities. The class will use a variety of examples, including guest speakers from the development professions, and insist on exchange of opinions.

Marketing

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

Argentina has been largely influences by the mass migration waves of the mid-19th century as well as subsequent immigrant arrivals. This mix of ethnics and cultures, together with the social and political events of the 20’s century, developed a particular type of culture and social personality with big similarities of the European ones, but also with strong difference in terms of values, ideals, behaviours and principles that affect the way Argentinians act and decide as consumers.

This class will start from the principles of marketing as a bridge to understand how Argentinian consumers behave in the local environment and how to develop strong marketing strategies aligned to their needs.

We will analyze together from one side the basic theory of market (price, productm channel, communication) and tools and a deep analysis of the major social forces which impact on the mind of the consumers.

Course Learning Objectives

  • Understand the basic principles and tools of the modern marketing;
  • Develop the capability to analyze on a scientific approach, business situation and their proper marketing response;
  • Analyze the major social forces that drive the Argentiniean consumer behaviour benchmarking it with other countries;
  • Develop strong marketinf strategies, that meet both business objectives together with local consumer needs;
  • Develop personal capabilities aimed to perform strong results in the market area (quantitative analysis, oral and written communication tools, business analysis)

 

Migration, Cultural Identity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Film

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

Argentina and the United States –along with Australia, Canada and Brazil- are considered to be “countries of immigrants”, whose societies have been largely influenced by the mass migration waves of the mid-19th century as well as subsequent immigrant arrivals. Both societies have been defined as “melting pots”.

This class will examine the ways in which racial and ethnic differences have been visualized in the United States and Argentina. Students will study how Hollywood has created films that analyze issues of race and ethnicity in a multicultural United States and, in a comparative perspective, examine how independent filmmakers have portrayed ethnic relations in Argentina’s social and economic reality of the 21st century.

We will explore how images have helped to “inscribe” a diverse range of narratives around cultural identity. By tracing the visual markers of difference(s) historically, we will discuss how images have operated both to “naturalize” structural patterns of oppression as well as to critique and challenge received notions regarding diversity.

Course Learning Objectives

  • To do an overview of approaches to multiculturalism.
  • To analyze theories of race, ethnicity and nationalism and their reflection in practice.
  • To discuss various models of interethnic relations (segregation/separation, assimilation, amalgamation, accommodation, integration, inclusion)
  • To analyze definitions and forms of discrimination (direct, indirect, victimization) as well as levels of discrimination (personal, cultural, institutional, structural).
  • To examine bias and explore the relationship between film and national culture in the United States and Argentina.
  • To analyze the ways in which racial and ethnic difference has been visualized in the United States and Argentina through application of image “codes” (framing, focus, costume, setting, performance) in films.
  • To understand how images support and disseminate narratives regarding racial and ethnic difference in the United States and Argentina.
  • To critique narratives regarding racial and ethnic difference in the United States and Argentina

 

Project Management

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Prerequisites Recommendation:
Basics of Business Administration
Management Accounting and Basics of Controlling

Course Description

Introduction to (agile) project management, definition of important terms (Kanban, Scrum, …), international standards, literature, process models.
Project goals and project benefits, project environment.
Organisational structures in projects, programs and portfolios.
Task planning and scheduling, determination of milestones.
Team organisation, conflict management, project management.
Expense estimation methods.
Risk management.
Change management.
Quality management.
Project completion phase; Project evaluation, completion of the project Organisation, dissolution of the project team, lessons learned.
Trends in project management.

Learning Outcomes

Upon completion of this module, students will be able to:
Describe international standards and procedures.
Formulate specific (SMART) project goals.
Analyse the respective project environment / stakeholder.
Apply relevant project management tools and methods, such as the creation of schedules and project plans, milestones and work packages.
Apply the principles of resource planning, risk management, and project controlling.
Understand why good project culture is characterized by trusting cooperation and diverse networking in the team, allowing mistakes and learning.
Solve conflicts that arise in a project team.
Determine how projects can ensure sustainability and value creation in organisations.
Derive a form of project management specific to their study programme/field.
Critically analyse leadership in teams.

Rights, Journalism and Democracy in Latin America

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

In this course, the incidence of journalism will be discussed in the rights that are effectively exercised in society at a given time, and how they are changing at different times. The analysis will take Latin America as a geographical framework because it has similar conditions in several fundamental aspects. Bibliography from political science, communication, history, sociology and law will be used.

 

  1. The heterogeneous and mobile Latin American citizenship.
  2. Journalism, history and rights.
  3. The journalistic scenario. The triple hybridity.
  4. Incidence of journalism in how victims are constituted.
  5. Access. How the victims access the journalistic agenda.
  6. The standing. What impact does journalism have on how victims manage to remain in the news scene?
  7. Resonance. What impact does journalism have on how victims obtain social knowledge?
  8. Consonance. What impact does journalism have on how victims achieve social consensus? The end of social indifference.
  9. What impact does journalism have on how rights are achieved? The end of state indifference.
  10. Incidence of journalism in the Executive Power.
  11. Incidence of journalism in the Legislative Power.
  12. Incidence of journalism in the Judiciary.
  13. What impact does journalism have on how rights are consolidated?
  14. Summary: how journalism affects the rights factory.

 

South American Societies, Cultures and Identities: A Sociological And Ethnographic Approach

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

This course introduces students to a sociology and ethnography of South America. During the course students will explore and become familiar with the nature of South American modernities and identities, the dynamics of South American societies and cultures, and the main social processes that have taken place in this part of the world since the constitution of nation-states and modernity.

The class has three sections. It begins by exploring both the historical development and character of modernity in the region. Discussions about peripheral modernity, hybridization, and issues of identity (for example, White, Indigenous, Creole, Afro, mestizo, etc.) are some of the main topics to be covered in the first part of the course. In order to understand and to deeply examine the constitution of South American modern nation-states, in the second section of the class three case-studies will be considered. Politics of identity, utopias, and imaginaries will be our main entry points to study: Brazil (racial democracy and modernity in the Tropics), Argentina (looking at the European mirror), and Peru (indigenous cultures and Inca utopia in the constitution of Peruvian nation-state). The third and last section focuses on the study of some of the most important social problems, conflicts, and social movements in contemporary Latin America. In this case, diaspora and migration, human rights, indigenous cultures and contemporary movements, marginality, poverty, and inequality, and political violence will be examined and discussed. Finally, during this class students will learn about South American pop culture. In this case, readings and discussions address three significant cultural expressions of South American pop culture: soup operas, football, and music.

Our work in this course requires that each of you come to class having critically reflected upon the week’s readings and prepared to share your understandings and engage with those of your classmates and professors. This course therefore requires wakeful reading and reflection prior to class, and mindful participation once there.

Class Format

 Each meeting will begin with a lecture and a powerpoint or Prezi presentation. In these presentations the instructor of the class will introduce students to the day’s subject. After this, the dynamic of the class will change from a lecture to a workshop in which students will present and discuss, under the instructor coordination, the readings assigned for that day.

Sports Law

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The objective of this course is to provide the students with all the practical and conceptual instruments and mechanisms to succesfully articulate legal relations with public and private sports bodies. It combines aspects of legal subjects (civil law, labour law, administrative law, sports law, contract law) etc., with de development of the necessary abilities of sports agents, advisors, etc. It focuses on the International Olympic Committee, the legal structures of football and the Antidoping bodies. In each class, a practical case tha recreates a real situation will be analyzed by the students under the guidance of the teacher.

Spanish I

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

 Throughout this course, students learn the basic grammatical and lexical structures needed to communicate in everyday life situations. Students are exposed to both Rioplatense Spanish (spoken in Argentina and Uruguay) as well as to Peninsular Spanish (spoken in Spain).

The course follows the guidelines of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) as an international standard to measure the students’ level of comprehension as well as their oral and written expression in Spanish.

Course Aims/Objectives

 To develop communicational skills in Spanish.

  • To understand and use everyday expressions and basic phrases to satisfy immediate needs
  • To introduce himself/herself and others
  • To ask and answer questions about personal details such as where he/she lives, people he/she knows and things he/she has.
  • To interact in a simple way provided the other person talks slowly and clearly and is prepared to help.
  • To describe experiences and events, dreams, hopes and ambitions and briefly give reasons and explanations for opinions and plans.

Learning Outcomes 

At the end of the course students should be able to:

  • Greet others, introduce themselves and say goodbye.
  • Exchange personal information and ask and answer questions.
  • Identify quantities of objects. Identify things in the classroom and talk about academic courses.
  • Ask about family relationships.
  • Express possession, age, nationality, and physical states.
  • Describe people and things.
  • Describe everyday activities, tell time and specify days of the week.
  • Express likes, dislikes, plans, intentions, knowledge and familiarity.
  • Talk about the months, seasons, and the weather.

Developmental Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will have improved their speaking and listening skills and should be able to communicate about a limited number of topics with native speakers.

Spanish II

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

 This course aims to allow students to achieve even greater familiarity with the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures. This course will focus on communication skills.

The course follows the guidelines of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) as an international standard to measure the students’ level of comprehension as well as their oral and written expression in Spanish.

Students are exposed to both Rioplatense Spanish (spoken in Argentina and Uruguay) as well as to Peninsular Spanish (spoken in Spain).

 Course Aims/Objectives

 To develop communicational skills in Spanish

  • To talk about habits, routines and free-time activities
  • To describe physical appearance
  • To describe physical symptoms
  • To give advice and recommendations and suggestions
  • To express wishes, expectations and emotions
  • To express prohibitions and commands
  • To talk about future plans and projects
  • To talk about past events

Learning Outcomes 

At the end of the course students should be able to:

  • Communicate in correct and fluid Spanish in informal and formal situations
  • Use the Imperative, the Future tense and the Past tenses
  • Give their opinions about topics associated with Spanish speaking countries.

Developmental Outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to communicate in correct and fluid Spanish in a variety of social situations.

Spanish III

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Descripción general

El siguiente curso está orientado a seguir profundizando los conocimientos gramaticales y lingüísticos en el idioma Español. Las clases se enfocan en desarrollar todas las habilidades comunicativas de la lengua, siguiendo el lineamiento del Marco Europeo de Referencia para las lenguas (MCER) / Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) como un estándar internacional para comprobar los niveles de comprensión de los alumnos y su uso oral y escrito del Español.

Los estudiantes analizaran la lengua tanto desde el punto de vista del Español Rioplatense (hablado en Argentina y Uruguay) como del Español Peninsular (Hablado en España)

Objetivos y competencias lingüísticas

Para lograr este objetivo general, el curso se propone los siguientes objetivos particulares:

Que el alumno logre:

  • Comprender los puntos principales de textos claros y en lengua estándar si tratan sobre cuestiones que le son conocidas, ya sea en situaciones de trabajo, de estudio o de ocio.
  • Entender textos básicos literarios y/o culturales.
  • Saber desenvolverse en la mayor parte de las situaciones que pueden surgir durante un viaje por zonas donde se utiliza la lengua.
  • Ser capaz de producir textos sencillos y coherentes sobre temas que le son familiares o en los que tiene un interés personal.
  • Describir experiencias, acontecimientos, deseos y aspiraciones, así como justificar brevemente sus opiniones o explicar sus planes.
  • Aproximarse al uso del subjuntivo presente.
  • Diferenciar usos de indicativo y subjuntivo.
  • Conocer y aplicar el uso del condicional («podría, cantaría, etc.»).
  • Comprender los usos del Pretérito pluscuamperfecto.
  • Implementar el uso de la Voz pasiva de presente.
  • Utilizar adecuadamente en sus redacciones y conversaciones verbos de opinión, pensamiento, creencia, etc.
  • Diferenciar el «se» impersonal y reflexivo.
  • Reforzar el uso de pronombres de Objeto Directo y Objeto Indirecto combinados.
  • Utilizar en sus producciones orales y escritas cláusulas condicionales básicas (período real presente: «si llueve, salgo a pasear»).

Resultados del proceso de aprendizaje

Al final del curso, los alumnos deben ser capaces de:

  • Relatar hechos pasados en diferentes planos temporales. Incluyendo descripciones de objetos y personas.
  • Leer y comprender narraciones y crónicas periodísticas (incluyendo audiocomprensión).
  • Hacer predicciones sobre el futuro.
  • Expresar cortesía.
  • Hablar de situaciones hipotéticas.
  • Dar instrucciones y órdenes.
  • Formular pedidos con diferentes estrategias discursivas según la situación.
  • Comprender el valor de los diferentes pasados y utilizarlos en sus producciones orales y escritas.
  • Organizar sus textos usando los conectores adecuados.
  • Controlar un repertorio amplio de palabras y frases no sólo relativas a contextos de uso conocidos sino también a aquellos que van más allá de su esfera de acción inmediata (temas de actualidad, problemas sociales, diferencias entre las culturas, etc.)

Spanish IV

Campus: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Descripción general

El siguiente curso está orientado a seguir profundizando los conocimientos gramaticales y lingüísticos en el idioma Español. Las clases se enfocan en desarrollar todas las habilidades comunicativas de la lengua, siguiendo el lineamiento del Marco Europeo de Referencia para las lenguas (MCER) / Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) como un estándar internacional para comprobar los niveles de comprensión de los alumnos y su uso oral y escrito del Español.

Los estudiantes analizarán la lengua tanto desde el punto de vista del Español Rioplatense (hablado en Argentina y Uruguay) como desde el del Español Peninsular (hablado en España)

Objetivos y competencias lingüísticas

Para lograr este objetivo general, el curso se propone los siguientes objetivos particulares:

Que el alumno logre:

  • Producir textos de mediana extensión, bien organizados, que muestran una estructura secuenciada, apoyada en el uso de conectores temporales, lógicos, causales y de consecuencia.
  • Usar estratégicamente hiperónimos, pronombres o paráfrasis tanto para evitar repeticiones como para favorecer una comunicación más efectiva y dinámica, supliendo  limitaciones en cualquier área de la competencia comunicativa.
  • Utilizar un registro tanto formal como informal.
  • Informar, aseverar (afirmar o negar), es decir transmitir o recibir información sobre algo que está ocurriendo, algo que ocurrió o algo que ocurrirá.
  • Expresar la opinión, la posibilidad y la hipótesis dando su parecer acerca de alguna idea o acontecimiento.
  • Dominar estructuras sencillas y ciertos aspectos de la gramática y sintaxis que son obligatorios (Ej: uso de subjuntivo con verbos de influencia)
  • Comprender el uso de todas las condicionales y los subjuntivos del pasado.

Resultados del proceso de aprendizaje

 Al final del curso, los alumnos deben ser capaces de:

  • Manifestar sus puntos de vista, tanto oralmente como por escrito en diversos ámbitos: personal (emociones, deseos, opiniones), laboral (opiniones, sugerencias, exhortaciones, consejos, pedidos), profesional (de manera acotada; exposiciones, carta formal) y académico (de manera acotada, exposiciones, textos formales)
  • Redactar cartas formales e informales, de petición o formulación de quejas.
  • Escribir redacciones e informes dando a conocer su opinión acerca de algún tema o acontecimiento.
  • Dar instrucciones , sugerencias y/o consejos dentro de un ámbito informal.
  • Expresar su opinión manifestando conformidad o disconformidad en situaciones cotidianas formales e informales.
  • Entender y seleccionar los puntos principales de artículos periodísticos, folletos, publicidades y carteleras. Puede entender el significado de una palabra o frase por el contexto.
  • Comprender un texto literario y dar su interpretación sobre el mismo.
  • Conocer muchas expresiones hechas de uso frecuente y puede utilizarlas.
  • Comprender con asistencia refranes, proverbios y modismos de uso poco frecuente.
  • Tener suficiente vocabulario sobre temas y situaciones frecuentes de la vida cotidiana y mundo conocido.