Universidad Austral offers 8 to 10 English-taught classes in our Buenos Aires facilities every semester.  These courses cover a variety of fields, with a focus on Argentina and/or Latin America, and are open  to international and local students alike.

 

Spring (March-June)

Economic Development in Argentina

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

The course analyses the economic development of the region from a historical perspective, paying special attention to some recent events in the region and in Argentina. The students will learn a variety of concepts, which will enable them to comprehend economic cycles, economic growth and the way regions interact with one another. This framework will be used to approach the study of the way in which the economy of different Latin American countries has evolved.

Contents:

After a brief overview of some fundamental concepts in the field of macroeconomics, the course will cover, among others:

  • Stages of economic development
  • Import substitution policies
  • Inflation
  • Stabilization
  • Dollarization
  • Socio-Economic development
  • Institutions and productivity
  • Poverty and Inequality

South American Societies, Cultures and Identities: A Sociological And Ethnographic Approach

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

This course introduces students to a sociology and ethnography of Latin America. During the course students will explore and become familiar with the nature of Latin American modernities and identities, the dynamics of Latin American societies and cultures, and the main social processes that have taken place in this part of the world since the constitution of nation-states and modernity.

The class has three sections. It begins by exploring both the historical development and character of modernity in the region. Discussions about peripheral modernity, hybridization, and issues of identity (for example, White, Indigenous, Creole, Afro, mestizo, etc.) are some of the main topics to be covered in the first part of the course. In order to understand and to deeply examine the constitution of Latin American modern nation-states, in the second section of the class three case-studies will be considered in order to understand the different ways in which nation-states were constructed in this part of the world. Politics of identity, utopias, and imaginaries will be our main entry points to study: Brazil (racial democracy and modernity in the Tropics), Argentina (looking at the European mirror), and Peru (indigenous cultures and Inca utopia in the constitution of Peruvian nation-state). The third and last section focuses on the study of some of the most important social problems, conflicts, and social movements in contemporary Latin America. In this case, diaspora and migration, human rights, indigenous cultures and contemporary movements, marginality, poverty, and inequality, and political violence, armed movements and drug cartels will be examined and discussed. Finally, during this class students will learn about Latin American pop culture. In this case, readings and discussions address three significant cultural expressions of South American pop culture: soup operas, football, and music.

Our work in this course requires that each of you come to class having critically reflected upon the week’s readings and prepared to share your understandings and engage with those of your classmates and professors. This course therefore requires wakeful reading and reflection prior to class, and mindful participation once there.

Immigration, Cultural Identity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Film

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

This class will examine the ways in which racial and ethnic differences have been visualized in the United States and Argentina. Students will learn how Hollywood has created films that analyze issues of race and ethnicity in a multicultural United States and, in a comparative perspective, examine how independent filmmakers have portrayed ethnic relations in Argentina’s social and economic reality of the 21st century. We will explore how images have helped to “inscribe” a diverse range of narratives around cultural identity. By tracing the visual markers of difference(s) historically, we will discuss how images have operated both to “naturalize” structural patterns of oppression as well as to critique and challenge received notions regarding diversity.

Literature of the Americas

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

This course analyzes some of the most important literary pieces of the Americas, focusing in three different traditions associated with particular geographies: North America, the Caribbean and the River Plate region.

Course Aims/Objectives

  • Knowing and understanding the literature of the Americas.
  • Reading and being able to recognize important American writers and their contributions.

Requirements and Prerequisites

Introductory Course

Learning outcomes  

This course aims to allow the student to:

  • know and understand different aspects of the American culture, especially its literature.
  • be able to compare different writers and genres, and speak critically about them analyze literature in relation to its historical, geographical and cultural context.

 

Sports Law

Credits: 3/ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The objective of this course is to provide the students with all the practical and conceptual instruments and mechanisms to successfully articulate legal relations with public and private sports bodies. It combines aspects of legal subjects (civil law, labour law, administrative law, sports law, contract law) etc., with de development of the necessary abilities of sports agents, advisors, etc. It focuses on the International Olympic Committee, the legal structures of football and the Antidoping bodies. In each class, a practical case tha recreates a real situation will be analyzed by the students under the guidance of the teacher.

Contents

In addition to the contents and classes below, the course will feature one or two visits (e.g. local football – i.e. soccer – team) depending on the organizations’ availability.

  1. STRUCTURE AND FEDERATIVE ORGANIZATION OF SPORTS  

Class 1. National and International Federative Organization of sport. National Sports Associations, AFA, International Olympic Commitee, National Olympic Commitees and FIFA. 

Class 2. The Court of Arbitration for Sports (TAS-CAS): history, principles, types and procedural rules. Organization of amateur sport in Argentina. Sports Law No. 20.655. The high sports performance.The National Board of High Sports Performance (El Ente Nacional de Alto Rendimiento Deportivo) and Law No. 26.573.

  1. SPORTS AND LABOUR LAW

Class 3. Relationship between the sportsman and his club. The amateur sportsman. The recruitment”. The athlete under age. Jurisprudence on the relationship between the amateur sportsman and his club.

Class 4. Sports and Labour Law. History and evolution of the relationship between the profesional football player and his club in Argentina. Law 20.160 and Collective Labour Agreement 557/09. Contract Form. Registration. Types. Promotional Professional Contract and Fixed Term Contract. The problem of the “unilateral prorogations ”. New AFA requirements for the registration of contracts. Offer of First Contract to an amateur football player (Art. 11 C.C.T. 557/09). Remuneration of the football player (Art. 13 C.C.T. 557/09). Awards. Travel Expenses.

Class 5. Guarantee of the remuneration (subparagraph b) Art. 13).Comparison with the institute of “inhibition” (Art. 3, section 4).-  Obligations of the club, AFA and the football player (Art. 17 C.C.T 557/09). Performance of the football player in a first or a reserve team (the “Caranta”case) and the “occupation duty”. Sanctions to the player for breach of his obligations. Termination of the contract of the profesional football player and its consequences.

  1. “TRANSFERS” OF SPORTSMEN

Class 6. Transfers of sportsmen. “Federative rights”. National and International Transfers . Art. 8 of C.C.T. 557/09.   FIFA´s Rules and Regulations about the status and transfer of football players (RSTP). The Transfer Matching System (TMS). The so called “economic rights”: conceptualization and problems. Jurisprudence in Argentina. Its recent ban.

Class 7. Protection of the minors in the international transfers of football players. History. Regulation. Jurisprudence. Contractual Stability in FIFA RSTP . Indemnifications and Sanctions. 

Class 8. Training Compensation in RSTP of FIFA. Objetive. Payment. Responsibility for payment. Costs of training. Calculus. Jurisprudence. Special Provisions for EU/EEE. Regulation of Training Compensation nationawide.

Class 9. Solidarity Mechanism in the RSTP of FIFA. Objetives. Calculus Procedure and responsability for payment. Special Cases. Jurisprudence.

  1. LEGAL REGULATION OF THE SPORTSMEN´S   REPRESENTATION

Class 10. Sports representation . Agents and sportspeople representatives. History of the regulation. The former rules and regulations of FIFA and AFA on Agents of Players.. The “deregulation”.   The regulations that rule the activity of the currently called “middlemen”. Jurisprudence.

  1. SPORT AND CIVIL LIABILITY

Class 11. Civil liability derived from the practice of sport: criteria of attribution of responsibility. Jurisprudence.

  1. SPORTS AND CRIMINAL LAW 

Class 12. Origins and functions of the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA). Procedure and prohibited substances worldwide. Doping: jurisprudence in Argentina and in TAS-CAS. Antidoping Law in Argentina. 

International Arbitration

Credits: 3/ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

This course on has been designed to meet the complex needs of practicing attorneys and advanced Law students, from a range of backgrounds, interested in gaining first-hand knowledge and practical tools in the field of international arbitration, specially related to international treaties and arbitration practice. The course is conducted in English. It features a practical approach, the use of the case-method, continuing assessment trough in-class questions, quizzes and a final exam.

Contents

Throughout the course the following topics will be covered:

  • General terms related to arbitration on International Private Law
  • Jurisdiction, applicable law, cooperation and exequatur concepts in the arbitration process
  • Material, conflict and policy rules. Treaties, laws, arbitration rules and UNCITRAL’s model law
  • Treaties supremacy. Treaties practical application: material, spatial and temporal scopes
  • Theory and inherent concepts related to arbitration process. Arbitration agreement, arbitration clause and arbitral compromise. Arbitral jurisdiction versus judicial jurisdiction. Ad hoc vs institutional arbitration.
  • Party’s autonomy. its only existence under the law and its limits.
  • International odre public. Policy rules. Arbitration prohibition.
  • Arbitration and administrative law.
  • Arbitral award and exequatur.
  • Indirect jurisdiction and applicable law to the arbitral award recognition (material and conflict rules). 1958 New York Convention, MERCOSUR treaties, CIDIP I, Las Leñas.
  • Exequatur denial cases.
  • Exequatur under Argentine law (Section 518 Procedural Code)
  • Arbitral awards and national courts revision.
  • Cooperation in the arbitral process
  • Legal seizures
  • Proof production
  • Imperium
  • Dealing with the arbitral clause in practice.
  • Formal and intrinsic validity.
  • Corporation’s incorporation place. Government submission to arbitration and sovereign law. Party’s autonomy inexistence; government capacity limited to the law. Tricks that governments use to avoid arbitral jurisdiction and obligations fulfillment.
  • Arbitration clause validity requisites.
  • Arbitration matter and party’s autonomy.
  • Kompetenz – Kompetenz. Arbitration rules and applicable law designation it’s limits given by exequatur.
  • Dealing with the arbitral clause in practice.
  • Pathological Clauses.
  • Midnight clause. Jurisdiction agreement importance in negotiations.
  • Detection, advice, dealing with contracts. Possible solutions.
  • 1958 New York Convention
  • 1975 Panamá Convention CIDIP I
  • 1985 UNCITRAL model law on arbitration
  • 1998 Mercosur treaties
  • 2012 ICC’s Arbitration rules.
  • CONTRACTUAL FREEDOM AND ITS LIMITS FOR CASES RESOLUTION IN ARBITRATION
  • What are international usages and international customs under international treaties?
  • Article 21 ICC Arbitration Rules and the “relevant trade usages”.
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts as a complement and an interpretation tool for the international treaties.
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles under substantive contractual freedom. Odre Public. Policy rules. Party’s autonomy limits.
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles in absence of substantive contractual freedom. Normological, sociological and axiological analysis.
  • Article 21 ICC Arbitration Rules and the applicable law.
  • Party’s autonomy axiological sources: ¿ICC or the applicable law?
  • What is an “appropriate law”. The end of government monopoly on law production? 

Inter-American Human Rights System

Credits: 3/ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The course examines in depth the system of protection of human rights in the Americas, centering on the protection of the individual, but also analyzing the effects of the same in the strengthening of democratic institutions and the rule of law in the hemisphere. The course will be divided in three parts. The first part of the course will study the foundations of International Human Rights Law, as an introduction. The second part will examine the practice and procedure of the Inter-American Human Rights System; including a practical hands-on training that will enable students to engage in real cases if they so wish. Finally, the third part of the course will expose students to the main developments of this regional system’s jurisprudence. Specifically, in this component there will be a discussion of the approaches of the Inter-American System with respect to the rights to life and physical integrity, freedom of expression, and indigenous peoples’ rights.

Students are required to read the assigned materials and participate actively in class discussion. Each student will be asked to prepare and give a brief talk (10 to 15 minutes) on some topic of their interest related to the syllabus. The students will be assessed through their participation in class, two essays throughout the course and a final exam.

Contents

Session 1: Introduction

  • Explanation of the course contents and methodology
  • Fundamentals of International Human Rights Law
  • Universality and cultural relativity
  • Human Rights standard-setting.

Session 2: International Human Rights Law (cont.) 

  • International protection of Human Rights
  • Universal and Regional systems of protection

Session 3: Introduction to the Inter-American Human Rights System

  • Origins and evolution
  • Nature, composition and functions of the Inter-American Commission and Court
  • Impacts at the domestic level.

Session 4: Individual complaints procedure before the IAHRS

  • Jurisdiction and Competence
  • Admissibility requirements
  • Notions of ‘victim’ and ‘person’
  • Exhaustion of domestic remedies
  • The “fourth instance formula”.

Session 5: Individual complaints procedure before the IAHRS (cont.)

  • Friendly settlement
  • Precautionary and provisional measures
  • Third party standing.

Session 6: Individual complaints procedure before the IAHRS (cont.)

  • Reports of the Commission on the merits
  • Procedure before the Court
  • Reparations
  • Monitoring compliance with judgments.

Session 7: Other functions of the Inter-American Commission and Court of Human Rights

  • Political functions
  • Rapporteurships
  • In loco visits. Public hearings
  • Thematic and annual reports

Sessions 8-9: The right to life and personal integrity 

  • Massacres, Extrajudicial killings, Forced disappearances
  • Death Penalty
  • Torture
  • Abortion and the question of the beginning of life

Sessions 10-11: Freedom of expression 

  • Freedom of the press in the Americas
  • The protection of journalists
  • Access to information
  • The legal standing of media enterprises before the IAHRS.

Sessions 12-13: Indigenous peoples’ rights

  • The legal standing of indigenous communities before the IAHRS
  • The right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC)
  • Standards for Extractive Industries.
  • Overall revision of the course 

Common Law Institutions (School of Law)

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0The comparison of the main legal institutions and norms of different areas of the Argentinean private law (Contracts, Law of Property, Law regulating Damages, Trusts, Company Law, Bankruptcy Law, Civil Procedural Law) with the American/British common law system.Contents:
  • Introduction to Legal English
  • The English Common Law System
  • The Doctrine of Stare Decisis
  • The U.S. Common Law System
  • The Legal Profession
  • The Court System in the U.S.
  • Court Procedures in the U.S.
  • Business Organizations in the U.S. I
  • Business Organizations in the U.S. II
  • Business Organizations in the U.K.
  • Law of Contracts I
  • Law of Contracts II
  • Law of Contracts III
  • Bankruptcy Law
  • Torts
  • Law of Trusts
  • Property Law
  • Negotiable Instruments 

Taxation of International Transactions

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0Course DescriptionThis course will provide an introduction to the main rules that govern the taxation of international transactions, such as: taxation of worldwide income, tax residence, sourcing rules, double tax treaties, anti-avoidance rules, transfer pricing, etc. The course will not only focus on Argentine law but will also cover US law and the model tax treaties designed by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The course does not require a background in tax law although it would be helpful. Course Aims/Objectives
  • To understand the importance of tax law in the structure of international commerce.
  • To learn the main rules that govern the taxation of international transactions.
  • To be able to identify and solve the main tax issues that arise out of an international transaction.

 

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course students should be able to:

  • Understand the basic concepts of international taxation.
  • Identify, define, and solve problems related to international taxation.

 

Developmental Outcomes

Although the class will be taught at an introductory level, students will be required to understand a few advance concepts and problems. Therefore, the class will challenge students to responsibly read materials before class, to ask relevant questions and focus their attention during class.

 

Class Methodology

The primary pedagogical techniques are: lectures, group discussion and group work based on lectures; and assigned readings.

 

Contents and Tentative Schedule

Week 1

  • Introduction
  • Concept of International Tax and basic principles.
  • Taxation on worldwide income.
  • The role of Income Tax Treaties. 

Weeks 2-3

  • Fiscal residence.
  • Source rules for income.
  • Taxation of foreign beneficiaries.
  • Permanent Establishment.

Weeks 4-5:

  • Taxation of foreign investments.
  • Controlled Foreign Corporation rules.
  • Foreign tax credit.

Weeks 6-7

  • Income Tax Treaties.
  • Treaty Shopping and limitation on benefits.
  • Offshore jurisdictions and tax havens.
  • International exchange of information. FATCA.

Weeks 8-9:

  • Transfer Pricing

Week 10:

  • Customs Law.
  • Value Added Tax.
  • Estate Tax.

Weeks 11-12-13:

  • International Tax planning.

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City: Buenos Aires

Credits: 3.0/ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

Cities around the world are striving to be ‘global’: Buenos Aires is one of the largest cities in Latin America, influencing both national and regional development and dominating Argentina’s economic, political, social and cultural processes. Students will gain insights into the ways in which globalization has affected the city and its inhabitants; analyze the changing nature of Buenos Aires’ relationship with the rest of the world; discover local diversity and examine the major social political and eco- nomic challenges facing the city today. The course will examine the emergence of this vibrant, cosmopolitan city as Argen- tina’s gateway to the world, the reasons people have for living in the city, the impact of rapid population growth and the influx of trans-national organizations into the city. The course also aims to help students contextualize their travels and encounters in the city, and to develop informed interpretations of their experience, as well as enhancing their understanding of recent Argentine history, culture and society. Topics will include the legacy of Spanish colonization and different peoples settling into the country, the transition to democracy and the recent impacts of Argentina’s debt crisis on the city as well as Buenos Aires’ significance as an important cultural hub.

Course Aims

The course aims to give students an understanding of, and appreciation for, the evolution of the global megacity, its govern- ance, and the complexity and richness of its various neighborhoods and sub-cultures. Students will be able to apply and relate critical theory to city living, urban development and the effects of culture and art on the city’s identity. Through fieldwork, students will experience Buenos Aires’ varied urban geographies first hand and interact with these sites in an informed and analytical way. They will consider what these sites reveal about the city’s complex histories, but also how they are used today to represent the city’s past to contemporary Porteños and tourists. The course is also intended to allow students to reflect on their home environments; to contextualize their own extra-curricular travels and encounters in the city during their stay; and to develop their own interpretations of Buenos Aires as a place to live, work and play.

Social Research Methodology (Quantitative & Qualitative)

Credits: 3.0/ECTS: 6.0

Course Description

The aim of the course is to give students the opportunity to increase their knowledge and experience in Methodology in Social Research. The focus will be on the coexisting epistemological paradigms within Social Sciences and the most commonly used methods for data collection and analysis.

The course is envisaged to provide the student the knowledge and skill related to identifying the interdependence between theoretical-epistemological assumptions and methods for approaching social phenomena.

 

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Recognize the underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions of different research approaches.
  • Identify advantages and disadvantages of quantitative and qualitative approach.
  • Distinguish the potential of each method, considering available resources and requirements of the research question to accomplish realistic planning in research design.
  • Design a research project by developing a sound relationship between research question, epistemological paradigm and methods.

Art and Politics

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

To be updated

International Finance

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

To be updated

International Economics

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

The International Economics module provides an understanding of the key economic issues in the global business environment. The course provides an understanding of how global businesses are impacted by real world developments in economics, politics and finance. The business environment is dynamic in nature. The course coverage is therefore updated periodically to include current real world evidence as well as recent academic and empirical findings. The five broad topics covered in the course are: Globalization, Country Differences, Cross-Border Trade & Investment, the Global Monetary System, and Competing in a Global Market Place. An overview of these five topics is provided below.

Globalization: Understanding the historical context of globalization is the starting point for developing insights into the state of globalization today. This topic discusses the drivers and importance of globalization, the emergence of the Bretton Woods global institutions in the post-War period, the state of the globalization debate and the impact of globalization on developed and developing countries.

Country Differences: This topic provides an introduction to political and economic systems and the determinants of economic development. It looks at the transition from socialist to capitalist economies after the collapse of the Soviet Union and the challenges faced by countries in managing this economic transition. It examines the key issues in economic development and the rise of developing economies in Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe and Africa.

Cross-Border Trade & Investment: The third topic reviews international trade and investment flows – portfolio and foreign direct investment – in the globalized context. It examines the theoretical underpinnings of capital and trade movements, providing country case studies to illustrate the supply-demand factors affecting these flows. The topic also places these cross-border flows in the context of economic integration – for example, the European Union, NAFTA, Mercosur, World Trade Organzation, and the recent developments towards free trade pacts between Asia-Pacific, Europe and the Americas.

Global Monetary System: Starting with the Bretton Woods institutions like the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank and other multilateral institutions, the topic provides an understanding of the global foreign exchange markets and the international monetary system. These institutions provide the backbone and the regulatory framework for international economics; the topic develops an understanding of their operations, management and challenges.

Competing in a Global Market Place: The final topic builds upon the understanding gained thus far by reviewing the economic and political risks and opportunities of participating in the global market place. The discussions include import-export and investment strategies, offshoring production, and management of human resources to compete effectively.

The course helps students examine the current economic landscape through topical discussions of current economic and political development and their impact on international economics.

International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

In the International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior course, students will study how theories, research, and current issues in the field of Organizational Behavior apply in the context of the international workplace. This course will focus on the international application of core management theories and strategies, and will be based on interdisciplinary research, from fields including psychology, sociology, economics, political science and anthropology. Students will be expected to increase their understanding of human behavior within the setting of a global work environment, and across a variety of historical and current issues. Students will also be expected to reflect critically on how theoretical frameworks can be applied and developed within the organizational setting.

The course incorporates Harvard Business School case studies from Nike, Colgate Palmolive, Lincoln Electric and Oil & Wasser as well as the students’ internship experiences to critically discuss and apply the thematic issues covered in the course. Additional cases may be included to add depth to the topics to be covered.

Fall (August-November)

Economic Development in Argentina

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

The course analyses the economic development of the region from a historical perspective, paying special attention to some recent events in the region and in Argentina. The students will learn a variety of concepts, which will enable them to comprehend economic cycles, economic growth and the way regions interact with one another. This framework will be used to approach the study of the way in which the economy of different Latin American countries has evolved.

Contents:

After a brief overview of some fundamental concepts in the field of macroeconomics, the course will cover, among others:

  • Stages of economic development
  • Import substitution policies
  • Inflation
  • Stabilization
  • Dollarization
  • Socio-Economic development
  • Institutions and productivity
  • Poverty and Inequality 

International Business Transactions

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0 

 

Course Description

The course aims at providing first-hand knowledge and practical tools in the field international business transactions, with a focus on international sales of goods under Vienna 80.

 

Contents 

  1. INTRODUCTION: DOING INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
  • Introduction to Cross Border Trade and International Commercial Transactions.
  • Conflict of laws, Foreign Law, and Comparative Law
  • Initiatives to reach consensus. Lex mercatoria
  • Principles of Contract Law: A Comparative Perspective of Different Legal Families

 

  1. PRACTICE IN INTERNATIONAL SALES OF GOODS
  • Doing international business
  • Usual practice in international commerce
  • Usages in international commerce
  • Characters and roles in international commerce

 

  1. INTERNATIONAL JURISDICTION AND APLICABLE LAW IN INTERNATIONAL SALES OF GOODS
  • General terms related to the sales of goods on International Private Law
  • International jurisdiction in international sales of goods
  • International sales of goods conflict of laws for issues excluded on the CISG

 

  1. APPLICABLE CONVENTIONS FOR THE INTERNATIONAL SALES OF GOODS
  • Sphere of application of the United Nations Convention on contracts for the international sale of goods, 1980 (CISG) Material, spatial and temporal aspects.
  • Sphere of application of the United Nations Convention on the limitation period in the international sale of goods, New York, 1974 (CLPISG) Material, spatial and temporal aspects.

 

  1. CONTRACTUAL FREEDOM AND ITS LIMITS UNDER THE CISG
  • What are international usages and international customs under the CISG?
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles of International Commercial Contracts as a complement and a interpretation tool for the CISG
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles under substantive contractual freedom
  • Sphere of application of the UNIDROIT Principles in absence of substantive contractual freedom. Normological, sociological and axiological analysis

 

  1. FORMATION OF THE CONTRACT OF INTERNATIONAL SALES OF GOODS
  • Classic concepts in the sphere of the CISG
  • Proposal, counter-offer and acceptance under different terms that constitutes and acceptance
  • Late acceptance
  • Acceptance under performing acts

 

  1. OBLIGATIONS OF THE SELLER AND BUYER UNDER THE CISG
  • Obligations of the seller under the CISG
  • Obligations of the buyer under the CISG
  • The conformity of the goods principle under the CISG

 

  1. CONTRACTUAL BREACH UNDER THE CISG
  • The kind of breach and its consequences
  • Avoidance of contract vs. obligation of keeping performing
  • Legal presumptions under domestic law (Argentina Commerce Code Sections 474, 208.5 and 476) vs. CISG presumptions (article 38.1 and 39.1)
  • Fundamental breach

 

  1. REMEDIES FOR BREACH OF CONTRACT
  • Remedies for breach of contract under the CISG
  • Preponderance of CISG’s remedies over domestic remedies

 

  1. BREACH OF CONTRACT CONSECUENCES
  • Article 74 extension
  • Interests under article 78 CISG
  • Mitigation of the losses
  • Reparation and substitution of goods

 

  1. PASSING OF RISK
  • Passing the risk under the CISG and in absence of the INCOTERMS
  • INCOTERMS 2000
  • Other clauses related to the risk passing: COD; etc.
  • Exemptions under the CISG

International Development Cooperation in Latin America

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

This course will explore development cooperation in an international context, focusing as much as possible on Latin America. It will describe chosen development challenges faced by the international community, and the actors working on reducing social and economic disparities. The class will use a variety of examples, including guest-speakers from the development professions, and insist on exchange of opinions.

Immigration, Cultural Identity and Multiculturalism in Contemporary Film

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

This class will examine the ways in which racial and ethnic differences have been visualized in the United States and Argentina. Students will learn how Hollywood has created films that analyze issues of race and ethnicity in a multicultural United States and, in a comparative perspective, examine how independent filmmakers have portrayed ethnic relations in Argentina’s social and economic reality of the 21st century. We will explore how images have helped to “inscribe” a diverse range of narratives around cultural identity. By tracing the visual markers of difference(s) historically, we will discuss how images have operated both to “naturalize” structural patterns of oppression as well as to critique and challenge received notions regarding diversity.

South American Societies. Cultures and Identities: A Sociological And Ethnographic Approach

Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

This course introduces students to a sociology and ethnography of Latin America. During the course students will explore and become familiar with the nature of Latin American modernities and identities, the dynamics of Latin American societies and cultures, and the main social processes that have taken place in this part of the world since the constitution of nation-states and modernity.

The class has three sections. It begins by exploring both the historical development and character of modernity in the region. Discussions about peripheral modernity, hybridization, and issues of identity (for example, White, Indigenous, Creole, Afro, mestizo, etc.) are some of the main topics to be covered in the first part of the course. In order to understand and to deeply examine the constitution of Latin American modern nation-states, in the second section of the class three case-studies will be considered in order to understand the different ways in which nation-states were constructed in this part of the world. Politics of identity, utopias, and imaginaries will be our main entry points to study: Brazil (racial democracy and modernity in the Tropics), Argentina (looking at the European mirror), and Peru (indigenous cultures and Inca utopia in the constitution of Peruvian nation-state). The third and last section focuses on the study of some of the most important social problems, conflicts, and social movements in contemporary Latin America. In this case, diaspora and migration, human rights, indigenous cultures and contemporary movements, marginality, poverty, and inequality, and political violence, armed movements and drug cartels will be examined and discussed. Finally, during this class students will learn about Latin American pop culture. In this case, readings and discussions address three significant cultural expressions of South American pop culture: soup operas, football, and music.

Our work in this course requires that each of you come to class having critically reflected upon the week’s readings and prepared to share your understandings and engage with those of your classmates and professors. This course therefore requires wakeful reading and reflection prior to class, and mindful participation once there. 

Current Issues in Latin American Journalism

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

To be uploaded soon.

Economics

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

 

Students will learn the main tools of economic analysis. The basic assumptions governing the decisions of economic subjects, that is the foundations of economic thoughts and actions, will be explained using key definitions and concepts.
Students will be able to analyse the economic decisions of individuals, households or businesses using case studies and discuss them in a competent manner. They will understand and be able to apply the basic concepts of how markets function (supply and demand, price formation, elasticity). They will be familiar with the mathematical basis for production and capital costs as well as price structures and cost curves in general. 
Finally, students will be able to comprehend the connection between micro-economic and macroeconomic concepts.

 

The course sets off with a general introduction into economic thinking. It is divided into two sections, microeconomics and macroeconomics. In the section on microeconomics students get an impression of the determinants of consumer choices, including intertemporal choices and those involving risk. Additionally, the course offers an overview of companies’ behaviour. In the section on macroeconomics students will acquire a logical and consistent framework for understanding the main macroeconomic facts and events, and develop the ability to employ macroeconomic tools to explain specific macroeconomic issues and justify policy proposals. The course provides an introduction of economic models to analyse contemporary and historical macroeconomic issues. Students should get a basic understanding of the causes of business cycles, long-run economic growth, unemployment or inflation and suggest appropriate macroeconomic policies to deal with each of these issues.

 

Business Planning

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

 

The business planning training course provides a foundation for developing a business idea and creating a business plan. Students will learn to address the key strategic, planning and budgetary issues. They will have the opportunity to review the initial stages of their plans using analytical and empiric data, which they collect. An introduction to financing options shall provide complementary knowledge.

 

Business planning is critical for the achievement of business objectives and achieving targets. Students get to know the key steps of the business planning process (purpose and key elements, understanding the business plan cycle, techniques for developing a business plan, typical formats for a business plan, relation to corporate objectives and strategy and identification of required resources). They will foster their knowledge on business analysis and strategic planning in the context of a business plan (e.g. market analysis, external trends, core competencies, SWOT, competitive profiling and analysis, BCG Matrix and other portfolio schemes).

 

Students will work on their own specific business plan and thereby experience how to conceive, evaluate and put together a successful business plan. They will develop key indicators to track progress. They will address budgetary aspects of their business plan and practice improving the plan in iterative cycles, based on feedback and discussion in class.

 

Marketing

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

 

The module serves as an introduction to marketing. First, various options and analysis procedures for selecting a suitable marketing strategy are covered, thus providing a foundation for the presentation of the best possible combination of classic and more recent marketing tools to achieve this strategy. The course also covers concrete marketing campaigns and methods.

 

This course provides an overview of the elements of marketing communication and how it is employed to further the goals of a company’s business through the building of a brand. Particular emphasis will be placed on the strategic thought behind the creation and implementation of a marketing and communication plan and how individual tactics are combined for maximum efficacy. Consideration of budget and evaluation of the results of advertising and public relations will also be covered. 
Students learn about the role of marketing communications in corporate strategy, how to develop a marketing and communication plan, and the various tactics to be considered in its execution. Students will gain an understanding of the reasoning required in using a marketing and communication campaign to build brands and how to work with advertising and PR agencies.

 

Project

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

 

The goal is to allow students to engage in their personal and profesional interests as part of their academic training. The course allows students to bridge the two worlds: professional study and personal interests. This may be strongly geared towards the content of their course of study but it has also the option of expanding the framework of their activities to develop a professional attitude towards their study.

 

With this learning project, the students apply their knowledge and background within a broader context. They learn to make use of their scientific capabilities for the benefit of tackling management issues and issues pertaining the media and the cultural industries.

 

The approach will be predominantly hands-on. The professor will teach the necessary theoritical framework and tools/skills. However, it will be a student-centered process albeit being guided and assessed by the professor.

Quantitative and Qualitative Methodology in Social Research

 Credits: 3.0 /ECTS: 6.0

 

Course Description

The aim of the course is to give students the opportunity to increase their knowledge and experience in Methodology in Social Research. The focus will be on the coexisting epistemological paradigms within Social Sciences and the most commonly used methods for data collection and analysis.

The course is envisaged to provide the student the knowledge and skill related to identifying the interdependence between theoretical-epistemological assumptions and methods for approaching social phenomena.

 

Learning Outcomes

On successful completion of the course, the students will be able to:

  • Recognize the underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions of different research approaches.
  • Identify advantages and disadvantages of quantitative and qualitative approach.
  • Distinguish the potential of each method, considering available resources and requirements of the research question to accomplish realistic planning in research design.
  • Design a research project by developing a sound relationship between research question, epistemological paradigm and methods. 

 

Course Contents

 

Unit 1. The social sciences and research: a complex field

  1. The research question
  2. Epistemology and paradigms
    1. The Positivist paradigm
    2. The Materialist paradigm
    3. The Interpretative paradigm
  3. Triangulation in social research: Paradigms and methods (ontology, epistemology and methodology of each approach) 

Bibliography

  • Guba, E.G. & Lincoln, Y.S. (1994) “Competing paradigms in qua­litati­ve research”, en Denzin, N.K. y Lincoln, Y.S. (eds) Handbook of Qualitative Research. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.
  • Creswell, J. W. (2009) Research design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage. Chapter 1.
  • Hesse-Biber, S. (2010) “Qualitative Approaches to Mixed Methods Practice”, Qualitative Inquiry 16(6) 455-468, Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Further reading

  • Bourdieu, P. et al. [1991 (1968)] The craft of sociology. Epistemological preliminaries. New York: De Gruyter. Ch. 2
  • Bryman, A. (1984) “The Debate about Quantitative and Qualitative Research: A Question of Method or Epistemology?” The British Journal of Sociology, Vol. 35, No. 1 London: Blackwell Publishing

 

Unit 2. From theory to empirical research

  1. From concept to social reality: ‘operationalization’ in the quantitative approach
  2. Qualitative and Quantitative research design
  3. The strategies: How do we collect data?
    1. The survey (The making of…)
    2. Participant Observation
    3. Interview

Bibliography

  • Bryman, Alan (2004) Social Research Methods. Chapter 15: Interviewing in qualitative research. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • De Vaus, D. (1996) Surveys in social research. Londres: UCL Press. Chapter 4.
  • Henn, M.; Weinstein, M. & Forrad, N. (2006) A short introduction to social research, London: Sage. Ch. 6. pp 137-143
  • Hesse-Biber, S. (2010) “Qualitative Approaches to Mixed Methods Practice”, Qualitative Inquiry 16(6) 455-468, Thousand Oaks: Sage.
  • Maxwell, J. (1996) Qualitative research design. An interactive approach. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.
  • Atkinson, P. & Hammersley, M. (1994) “Ethnography and participant observation” In NK Denzin and YS Lincoln (Eds.) Handbook of Qualitative Research, Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.
  • Holstein, J.A. & Gubrium, J.F. (1995) The active interview. Thou­sand Oaks, California: Sage. Chapters 1, 2, 3 & 8.
  • Atkinson, R. (2001) “The life story interview”. In Holstein & Gubrium, Handbook of interview research. Thousand-Oaks: Sage. Ch. 6.

Further reading

  • Creswell, J. W. (2009) Research design. Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage. Chapter 9.

 

Unit 3: Selecting cases and data analysis (establishing a dialogue with data)

  • Sampling and field work design: in quanti / quali research
  • Analyzing quantitative data: statistical relations
  • Validity and reliability in quantitative and qualitative perspectives.
  • Analyzing qualitative data (negotiation)
  • Case Study

Bibliography

  • Cohen, B. & Lea, R. (2004). Essentials of Statistics for the Social and Behavioral Sciences. New Jersey: Wiley. Chapter 1. pp 1-17
  • Gerring, J. (2004) “What Is a Case Study and What Is It Good for?”, in American Political Science Review (98)2, Boston University.
  • Henn, M.; Weinstein, M. & Forrad, N. (2006) A short introduction to social research, London: Sage. Ch. 6. pp 125-137
  • Rapley, T. J. (2001) “The art (fulness) of open-ended interviewing: some considerations on analysing interviews”, Qualitative Research (1)3: 303-323. Thousand-Oaks, California: Sage.
  • Taylor-Powell, E. & Renner, M. (2003) “Analyzing Qualitative Data”. Programa Development and Evaluation. University of Wisconsin.